Pinus mugo | Landscape Plants | Oregon State University

Native to (or naturalized in) Oregon: Conifer, evergreen shrub, multistemmed or many branched, low growing form of the species, wider than tall, less than 8 ft tall x 16 ft wide (2.5 x 5 m). Size variable due to seed source. Needles in pairs, usually 2.5-5 cm long, …

Pinus mugo 'Mops' (Dwarf Mountain Pine)

Highly popular, Pinus mugo 'Mops' is a dwarf evergreen conifer forming a dense, rounded cushion, adorned with slender, silvery-blue needles most of the year, except in winter when the foliage acquires a golden cast. Slow-growing, 3-5 in. per year (7-12 cm), this Dwarf Mountain Pine is a terrific for foundation plantings, rock gardens and small gardens.

Pinus cembroides / Mexican piñon pine | Conifer Species ...

Pinus cembroides, as described in 1832 by Joseph Gerhard Zuccarini (1790–1848), is commonly known as Mexican piñon, stone seed piñon, three-leaf piñon, or simply pinyon pine; as well as pino piñonero in the Spanish language. The species name means "like cembra," meaning that this species is another good source of edible pine nuts.

Pinus monophylla | Landscape Plants | Oregon State University

Native to (or naturalized in) Oregon: No. Conifer, evergreen, tree to 50 ft (15 m) tall, slow growing, often multistemmed, upswept branches, rounded or flat crown. Leaves single, rarely 2 per bundle, about 3 cm long, stiff, thick, circular in cross section, prickly, gray-green and striped. Cones short stalked, to 5 cm long, wider, thick scales ...

Pinus pumila / Japanese stone pine | Conifer Species ...

Japanese stone pine is a shrubby, evergreen, coniferous species of tree that grows to mature heights of 20 feet (6 m), usually with creeping branches extending up to 35 feet (10 m). Bark is gray-brown and flaking. Branchlets are initially brown, later dark red-brown in …

Pinus ponderosa: A checkered past obscured four species

Pinus arizonica Engelm.; and (3) P. ponderosa var. benthamiana from Butte County, California, was sister to subsection Sabinianae ( Parks et al., 2012 ). Unfortunately, these gene trees included only a few exemplars of each named species and could not test the status